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Coffee vs. Tea: Is One Healthier Than the Other?

It’s been an ongoing and long debate on which type of drink is healthier, is it coffee or tea? Let put an end tot hat debate with a research we found summarizing all the benefits, and effects coffee and tea has on a person. On a personal note though, no matter the outcome, our cup of joe will always be our number one. Read on and let us know what you think!

Caffeine

Caffeine is the most studied and consumed stimulant in the world (2, 3).

Present in many common beverages, including coffee and tea, it’s known for both its beneficial and adverse effects on human health.

While the caffeine content can vary depending on brewing time, serving size, or preparation method, coffee can easily pack twice the caffeine as an equal serving of tea.

Though scientists have primarily focused on coffee when researching the positive effects of caffeine, both drinks — despite containing differing amounts of this substance — can provide its associated health benefits.

Caffeine intake may reduce your risk of certain chronic diseases and improve athletic performance, mood, and mental alertness (7, 8, 9).

Caffeine works as a powerful stimulant for your central nervous system, which is why it’s considered a performance-enhancing substance in sports (10, 11, 12).

One review of 40 studies determined that caffeine intake improved endurance exercise outcomes by 12%, compared with a placebo (13).

As for caffeine’s effect on mental alertness, research shows that it improves performance in both simple and complex tasks (14, 15).

A study in 48 people who were given a drink containing either 75 or 150 mg of caffeine revealed improvements in reaction times, memory, and information processing, compared with the control group (16).

Other studies indicate that caffeine may reduce type 2 diabetes risk by improving insulin sensitivity (17).

A review of 9 studies in 193,473 people showed that regularly drinking coffee significantly lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes (18, 19).

What’s more, moderate caffeine intake has been associated with protective effects against dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (20, 21, 22, 23, 24).

Caffeine is a powerful stimulant that has been associated with protective effects against some chronic diseases. Coffee contains more caffeine per serving than black tea, but both beverages may provide its associated benefits.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants protect your body against free radical damage, which may help prevent the development of certain chronic diseases (25).

Both tea and coffee are loaded with antioxidants, primarily polyphenols, which contribute to their characteristic flavor and health-promoting properties (26, 27, 28, 29).

A recent test-tube study discovered that theaflavins and thearubigins inhibited the growth of lung and colon cancer cells and ultimately killed them (32).

Long-term studies in humans and further research that has analyzed larger pools of evidence show that coffee and tea may also protect against other kinds of cancers, such as breast, colon, bladder, and rectum cancer (36, 37, 38, 39, 40).

Aside from their antioxidant activities, polyphenols have been linked to a reduced rate of heart disease (41).

They contribute to heart health via various blood-vessel-protective mechanisms, including (42, 43, 44):

  • Vasodilating factor. They promote blood vessel relaxation, which helps in cases of high blood pressure.
  • Anti-angiogenic effect. They block the formation of new blood vessels that may feed cancer cells.
  • Anti-atherogenic effect. They prevent plaque formation in blood vessels, lowering heart attack and stroke risk.

A 10-year study in 74,961 healthy people determined that drinking 4 cups (960 ml) or more of black tea per day was associated with a 21% lower risk of stroke, compared with non-drinkers (45).

Another 10-year study in 34,670 healthy women showed that drinking 5 cups (1.2 liters) or more of coffee per day lowered the risk of stroke by 23%, compared with non-drinkers (46).

Both coffee and tea contain different types of polyphenols, which are powerful antioxidants that protect against heart disease and cancer. Both coffee and tea can give you an energy boost — but in different ways.

 

Coffee vs. Tea: Is One Healthier Than the Other?

Energy

Coffee’s energy-boosting effect

The caffeine in coffee elevates your energy levels.

Dopamine is the chemical messenger responsible for the jittery effect of coffee, as it increases your heart rate. It also affects your brain’s reward system, which adds to coffee’s addictive properties.

On the other hand, adenosine has a sleep-promoting effect. Thus, by blocking it, caffeine reduces your feelings of tiredness.

Once ingested, your body absorbs 99% of its caffeine within 45 minutes, but peak blood concentrations appear as early as 15 minutes after ingestion (48).

This is why many people prefer a cup of coffee when they need an immediate energy boost.

Tea’s effect on energy

Though tea is lower in caffeine, it’s rich in L-theanine, a powerful antioxidant that also stimulates your brain (49, 50).

Unlike caffeine, L-theanine may provide anti-stress effects by increasing your brain’s alpha waves, which help you calm down and relax (51).

This counteracts the arousing effect of caffeine and gives you a relaxed but alert mental state without feeling drowsy.

Both coffee and tea increase your energy levels. However, coffee gives you an instant kick, while tea offers a smooth boost.

Weightloss

Due to its high caffeine concentration, coffee may help you lose weight.

Caffeine may increase the number of calories you burn by 3–13%, and maintain this effect for 3 hours after intake, translating into an extra 79–150 calories burned (54, 55, 56, 57).

Coffee has also been associated with fat-burning properties by inhibiting the production of fat cells. Some studies have attributed this effect to its chlorogenic acid content (58, 59).

On the other hand, tea polyphenols like theaflavin also seem to contribute to weight loss.

Theaflavins reportedly inhibit pancreatic lipase, an enzyme that plays a key role in fat metabolism (62).

Black tea polyphenols also seem to alter the diversity of your gut microbiota, or healthy bacteria in your intestines, which may impact weight management.

However, further human research is needed to confirm these results. The caffeine in coffee and polyphenols in tea may help you lose weight, but more human studies are needed to confirm these effects.

Side Effects

Though coffee has been associated with multiple side effects, such as heart failure, increased heart rate, and high blood pressure, research shows that moderate consumption is safe (66).

Other health claims attributed to coffee include protection against Parkinson’s disease and a lowered risk of type 2 diabetes and liver cirrhosis. On the other hand, tea may protect against cavities, kidney stones, and arthritis (1).

Coffee has a higher caffeine content than tea, which may be good for those looking for an instant energy fix. However, it may cause anxiety and impaired sleep in sensitive people (8).

Also, due to caffeine’s effect on your brain, high coffee intake may result in dependence or addiction (67).

Moreover, you can go for a decaf option of either beverage or choose herbal tea, which is naturally caffeine-free. While they won’t provide the same benefits, they may offer benefits of their own (68).

Coffee and tea offer similar health benefits, including weight loss, anticancer, and energy-boosting properties. Still, you may want to choose one over the other depending on your caffeine sensitivity.

 

Coffee and black tea may aid weight loss and protect against certain chronic diseases via various metabolic processes.

Plus, the high caffeine content of coffee may give you a quick energy boost, whereas the combination of caffeine and L-theanine in black tea offers a more gradual increase in energy.

Both beverages are healthy and safe in moderation, so it may come down to personal preference or your sensitivity to caffeine.

 

 

 

 

Espresso Vs Coffee: Differences You Didn’t Know About

“An extra shot of espresso please!” is probably one of the most popular lines you hear in a coffee shop. We already know the basic difference between coffee and espresso but how much do we really know about them? What secrets should we uncover between our favorite black gold?

Click here to view original web page at www.coffee-brewing-methods.com

Coffee – it’s such a general term that covers so many different beverages. Have you ever wondered why your morning drip coffee from your machine at home tastes and looks completely different to the espresso drinks you order in a cafe? You’re not alone! As it turns out, espresso and drip coffee are totally different drinks that suit different people in different situations. Not to mention all of the other types of coffee such as French Press coffee, pour over coffee or even instant coffee.

Entire books have been written on all the different types of coffee and we could talk about this topic for days. In this article therefore, we are going to be focusing on and answering the very important question why would you choose one vs the other?

Preparation Makes the Difference!

So, I mentioned that espresso was invented to make the coffee brewing experience faster and more convenient.

Filter coffee was also invented to make it more convenient to brew and filter coffee. From this perspective coffee and espresso are the same. However, this is where the similarities stop.

Drip Coffee Preparation

Swan Neck Spout Kettle

Manual Drip Coffee

Drip coffee is brewed just by putting ground coffee beans into contact with hot water. The The hot water and coffee pass through a filter, letting the water extract the flavors from the beans over time. This process normally takes around 4 – 5 minutes. Drip coffee is a gravitation brewing method. We pour water over the grounds and then gravitation pulls all the water through the coffee bed, extracting soluble solids in the way.

For drip coffee to work, we need to grind the beans to a medium grind size. The grind size acts as a timer for the brewing process. Grind too fine, and brewing will take too long, (and over-extract). Grind too coarse and the brewing will be too fast, (will under-extract). The medium grind allows the water to flow for the 4-5 minutes exactly.

For our drip coffee tutorial, check this page: How To Make Drip Coffee. Is a great article, aimed at all barista levels from beginner to advanced.

On the other hand, the brewing time for an espresso, however, is maximum 30 seconds. How is this achieved?

An espresso machine machine forces hot water through the ground coffee at very high pressure, (around 9 bar pressure), to achieve this quicker extraction.

In order to create the necessary resistance, coffee beans need to be ground much finer for espresso than for drip coffee. The water still needs to be long enough in contact with the coffee in order to extract the right amount of flavors.

Espresso Brewing and Extraction

Espresso Vs Coffee: Differences You Didn't Know About 1

The extraction concept applies to espresso as well, too long the extraction, you get bitter coffee. Too short and and you get sour and weak coffee. When you ground too fine, the water will pass too slow through the puck of ground coffee. When you grind too coarse, water will pass too fast.

Check our espresso brewing guide, is truly, one of the best brewing guides online. We go through all of the brewing aspects and show you what you can improve, and how to troubleshoot your espresso.

Espresso vs Coffee – Look and Taste

Drip coffee is thin and has no crema. Espresso on the other hand is thick, oily and, if prepared properly, has a delicious crema sitting on top. Drip coffee tends to taste milder and brighter compared to espresso, which tastes stronger and more full-bodied.

Now, we have discussed how espresso is brewed differently to coffee. Espresso needs high pressure and a fine coffee grind. Drip coffee needs a filter, courser grind and gravity. These different methods of brewing allow for different properties of the bean to pass into the coffee or into the espresso. First let’s deal with the look of the coffee.

Appearance

We use a filter for drip coffee to stop too many of the potentially harmful properties from the ground coffee getting into our drink. This is because the water is in contact with the coffee for so much longer. The obvious exception to this rule is the French Press, but that’s the topic for another article! The quicker brewing method for espresso has it’s advantages and disadvantages. The fact that the water is in contact with the coffee for much less time means there is no need for a filter.

Espresso Shot In Cup  Drip Coffee Cup

Coffee Oil

No filter means one thing to coffee lovers – oil! The oil from the coffee bean contains many microscopic and insoluble substances. With no paper filter, some of these compounds find their way into the espresso, even in the short brewing time. These substances don’t dissolve in water, which is why they don’t pass through the filter. This makes espresso a much thicker, oilier drink.

The oils in the espresso are emulsified into a colloid. What on earth does that mean, I hear you ask? A colloid is basically tiny particles from one substance that are suspended throughout another substance. This is important, because it gives us our crema, and brings us onto the difference in taste between coffee and espresso.

Taste

The presence of oil in an espresso means that we get more gorgeous tastes in our coffee from the oil. Crema is really what’s important here though. It acts almost as a cover for the espresso and locks in all of these flavors, keeping espreso flavorful for longer.

Drip coffee, on the other hand, has none of the oily properties, (or at least much, much less), that we find in an espresso, so these flavors are missing. However, all is not lost for filter coffee. The fact that the water is in contact with the coffee beans for so much longer means that it is able to extract different flavors over time that we don’t find in an espresso.

Tasting Notes

The tasting notes in an espresso tend to be darker, nuttier and more chocolaty (in coffee terms). Lots of espressos will have a more bitter taste than drip coffee. This is due to badly prepared coffee though more than an actual quality of the espresso. Well prepared espresso should be sweet to taste.

Typical tasting notes for filter coffee then, tend to be fruiter, brighter and more acidic (in terms of PH, not actual acid). Whether espresso or drip coffee is tastier or better is completely down to the individual. These tastes can also be adjusted and manipulated depending on the type of bean used and the type of roast, more on that now.

Fun fact: If you add sugar to coffee, as well as making it sweeter, it makes coffee more acidic, which is how we usually deal with badly made coffee!

Various coffee bean roasts

Typical Roasts for Espresso and Drip Coffee

To a certain extent, espresso blends do tend to be darker roasted, and the main reason for that is that it makes the extraction easier. With darker roasts, a home barista has more chances to get a decent shot than with lighter roasts. Also, this choice favors the roast flavors in darker roasts. For instance with darker roasts we get nutty, caramel and chocolate notes. With lighter roast we preserve fruity, bright, acidic. But this discussion deserves its own dedicated space.

Historically, drip coffee beans have been roasted in the range from medium to dark. The reason was commercial. Firstly, it was easier to roast a consistent blend that way. A blend that people knew and got used to. Secondly, it was cheaper that way. Thirdly, coffee is an acquired taste, and the unprepared coffee lover will have a hard time changing tasting notes with every new bag of beans. And finally, an automatic drip coffee maker gives you no control over the brewing process. Changing beans and roasts requires a higher level of control over all brewing factors.

This is not really the case anymore though, with the development of the specialty and Third Wave coffee movement. Coffee roasters now experiment with and use all types of roast for all types of brewing. I love to experiment with lighter roasts for my espresso machine.

A Myth Debunked – Caffeine!

Nearly everybody presumes that espresso has more caffeine than coffee because it is thicker and stronger to taste. I certainly did, and technically that is the case – if we are talking about the same amount of liquid. If we are talking about serving though, our drip coffee actually has more caffeine in it than an espresso.

Caffeine Quantities in Espresso vs Drip Coffee

A standard espresso serving is one fluid ounce. An average cup of drip coffee is 8 fluid ounces, and probably bigger for the standard coffee drinker! This means that a standard espresso has up to 80 milligrams of caffeine whereas an 8 ounce cup of drip coffee has up to 185 milligrams of caffeine.

If you do the quick math, you’ll see that even a double espresso serving contains less caffeine than a standard cup of coffee, so for your caffeine fix – stick to your drip coffee!

I always raved about coffee’s versatility, and how from two ingredients, water and coffee beans we can make so many different beverages. Espresso and filter coffee – two completely different drinks, both technically coffee. They appeal to different coffee lovers,

Where to Drink Coffee in Ottawa Besides Starbucks

Canada’s capital is not a big city, some consider it a nice in-between small towns and big cities like Toronto and Montreal. Young people mostly complain about the total lack of night life. Families

Ottawa’s coffee shops though is a different story. Coffee lovers will find here a variety of options, from the big chains such as Starbucks, to small one location shops, and everything in between. The local shops are committed to fair trade, organic beans and sustainability. It’s very easy to find quality local roasters, though the coffee equipment lacks competition, and customers are driven to online shops.

The article from Montreal Eater reviews some of Ottawa’s coffee shops, and we hope you will add your favorite one in the comments section.

Where to Drink Coffee in Ottawa

Where to Drink Coffee in Ottawa

Ottawa’s coffee game is strong, local, and committed to its neighbourhoods: city-based chains are expanding beyond the downtown core, while independent cafés are establishing roots across the city. There’s a dedication to fair trade, organic beans here, and it’s easy to find quality local roasters as well as great beans from top Canadian and international outfits. It’s easy to find a place to call home — or your office, though some shops limit wifi access to two hours.

Ottawa’s cafés also show a serious love of home baking, and often have a community vibe to them. Special events and classes take place in many cafés: from life-drawing evenings to classes on how to make preserves, board game nights to sourdough sessions. Regular latte art showdowns keep Ottawa’s baristas creative (follow your favourite shop’s Instagram to get details), so there’s no reason to settle for anything but the best coffee when you’re in or around the capital.

Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

40 Chemin Scott, Chelsea
QC J9B 1R5, Canada

(819) 827-1777

Visit Website

Located on the edge of Gatineau Park in Chelsea, one-year old Palmier is a destination for coffee, pastries (check out their collaboration with Red Door Provisions), and a welcoming back room. The menu also features tacos made with house-made tortillas.

42 Crichton St, Ottawa
ON K1M 1V4, Canada

(613) 695-9642

Visit Website

Tucked halfway between the Minto Bridges and “Fort Pearson” to the west and the Rideau Hall to the east, the tiny Union Street Kitchen Café has a loyal neighbourhood following drawn in by the coffee shop’s cozy tables and home-made desserts. There’s a yoga studio in the back, too, offering classes throughout the week and on Sundays.

117 Beechwood Ave, Ottawa
ON K1M 1L6, Canada

(613) 695-6804

Visit Website

Red Door Provisions recently opened up its bright space in Beechwood Village, which means more room to enjoy their new slow bar and hang out with a coffee and one of their signature grilled cheese sandwiches or vegan pop tarts. The “provisions” in their name refers to preserves and jams made in-house. Classes for these, as well as home brewing, should start up in fall 2019.

41 Rue Victoria, Gatineau
QC J8X 2A1, Canada

(819) 772-1234

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A short walk from the Canadian Museum of History in Hull, Marius Provence showcases organic, fair trade coffee and a range of artisanal sandwiches, including vegan options.

24a York St, Ottawa
ON K1N 1K2, Canada

(613) 789-6261

Visit Website

Nestled in a historic courtyard in the Byward Market, Planet Coffee has been around for over twenty-five years. An espresso — and an espresso brownie — might be just the lift you need after a visit to the National Gallery or a stroll around Major’s Hill Park, both just minutes away by foot.

692 Somerset St W, Ottawa
ON K1R 6P4, Canada

(613) 233-7626

Visit Website

This snug café by day and bar by night is right at the Chinatown gate, an area somewhat light on coffee options. Bar Robo might be better known as an evening hangout, often hosting shows, but the daytime atmosphere is relaxed, with homemade doughnuts, lovely staff, and a good playlist to keep you going.

5 Arlington Ave, Ottawa
ON K2P 1C1, Canada

(613) 233-7959

Visit Website

Owned by the folks at Wilf and Ada’s around the corner, this cozy spot is worth visiting even if you’re not in the Wilf & Ada’s brunch line on the weekend. Beyond coffee, the café has events like mason jar exchanges, “life-and-death” drawing sessions, and dry bar evenings.

130 Anderson St, Ottawa
ON K1R 6T7, Canada

(613) 233-1221

Visit Website

The Ottawa coffee chain, Bridgehead’s fair trade beans and commitment to the community have helped the company grow into a major player, with each of its shops channeling funding to local community organizations. Coffee aficionados and aspiring sourdough bakers curious about where the magic happens can take a monthly tour of their spacious Anderson Street roastery and bakery. It’s the chain’s biggest location in town, but with 19 coffeehouses dotted around the city, a Bridgehead is never far away.

35 Laurel St, Ottawa
ON K1Y 4M4, Canada

(613) 792-1309

With five locations around the city, Happy Goat’s comfortable cafés are a good way to start or end a day — with open mic and board game nights, if that’s your thing. Happy Goat sells ethically sourced beans wholesale and retail, runs brewing classes, and most of the treats on offer are vegan. The original location (right here) is housed in a spacious warehouse with ample seating for the laptop crowd.

1013 Wellington St W, Ottawa
ON K1Y 2Y1, Canada

(613) 695-9002

Visit Website

One of the original third wave coffee spots in the city, the Ministry of Coffee’s recent expansions into Beechwood and the Via Railway Station build on a strong brewing reputation established at the original Elgin Street location. By day, gourmet sandwiches, baked goods, and nitro brew on tap are featured — the large Wellington Street location also stays open into the night, with craft beer and other drinks on offer.

801 Bank St, Ottawa
ON K1S 3V7, Canada

(613) 286-8647

Visit Website

Originally housed in a bicycle shop in Hintonburg, small batch coffee roaster Little Victories has decamped to an airy new café in the Glebe. Its attention to detail is reflected in everything from the ethically sourced beans and brewing gear they sell, through to the design and printing on their bags.

412 Churchill Ave N, Ottawa
ON K1Z 5C6, Canada

(613) 722-1919

Visit Website

Equator Coffee’s reputation for beans, brewing, and teaching extends from Westboro to beyond city limits in Almonte, while bureaucrats and art lovers alike can take in the view of Parliament from Equator’s newest location at the National Arts Centre downtown. This roaster maintains a strong connection to the communities where it sources organic, fair trade coffee, with the owners periodically heading to Nicaragua for the coffee harvest and to build classrooms.

1523 Stittsville Main St, Stittsville
ON K2S 1A6, Canada

Visit Website

Stittsville residents flock to Quitters for daytime coffee and nighttime drinks served up by musician Kathleen Edwards. Fully licensed and kid- (and dog-) friendly, Quitters has a self-described rowdy Saturday night trivia scene, a patio, and parking.

Located on the edge of Gatineau Park in Chelsea, one-year old Palmier is a destination for coffee, pastries (check out their collaboration with Red Door Provisions), and a welcoming back room. The menu also features tacos made with house-made tortillas.

40 Chemin Scott, Chelsea
QC J9B 1R5, Canada

(819) 827-1777

Visit Website

Tucked halfway between the Minto Bridges and “Fort Pearson” to the west and the Rideau Hall to the east, the tiny Union Street Kitchen Café has a loyal neighbourhood following drawn in by the coffee shop’s cozy tables and home-made desserts. There’s a yoga studio in the back, too, offering classes throughout the week and on Sundays.

42 Crichton St, Ottawa
ON K1M 1V4, Canada

(613) 695-9642

Visit Website

Red Door Provisions recently opened up its bright space in Beechwood Village, which means more room to enjoy their new slow bar and hang out with a coffee and one of their signature grilled cheese sandwiches or vegan pop tarts. The “provisions” in their name refers to preserves and jams made in-house. Classes for these, as well as home brewing, should start up in fall 2019.

117 Beechwood Ave, Ottawa
ON K1M 1L6, Canada

(613) 695-6804

Visit Website

A short walk from the Canadian Museum of History in Hull, Marius Provence showcases organic, fair trade coffee and a range of artisanal sandwiches, including vegan options.

(819) 772-1234

Visit Website

Nestled in a historic courtyard in the Byward Market, Planet Coffee has been around for over twenty-five years. An espresso — and an espresso brownie — might be just the lift you need after a visit to the National Gallery or a stroll around Major’s Hill Park, both just minutes away by foot.

24a York St, Ottawa
ON K1N 1K2, Canada

(613) 789-6261

Visit Website

This snug café by day and bar by night is right at the Chinatown gate, an area somewhat light on coffee options. Bar Robo might be better known as an evening hangout, often hosting shows, but the daytime atmosphere is relaxed, with homemade doughnuts, lovely staff, and a good playlist to keep you going.

692 Somerset St W, Ottawa
ON K1R 6P4, Canada

(613) 233-7626

Visit Website

Owned by the folks at Wilf and Ada’s around the corner, this cozy spot is worth visiting even if you’re not in the Wilf & Ada’s brunch line on the weekend. Beyond coffee, the café has events like mason jar exchanges, “life-and-death” drawing sessions, and dry bar evenings.

5 Arlington Ave, Ottawa
ON K2P 1C1, Canada

(613) 233-7959

Visit Website

The Ottawa coffee chain, Bridgehead’s fair trade beans and commitment to the community have helped the company grow into a major player, with each of its shops channeling funding to local community organizations. Coffee aficionados and aspiring sourdough bakers curious about where the magic happens can take a monthly tour of their spacious Anderson Street roastery and bakery. It’s the chain’s biggest location in town, but with 19 coffeehouses dotted around the city, a Bridgehead is never far away.

130 Anderson St, Ottawa
ON K1R 6T7, Canada

(613) 233-1221

Visit Website

With five locations around the city, Happy Goat’s comfortable cafés are a good way to start or end a day — with open mic and board game nights, if that’s your thing. Happy Goat sells ethically sourced beans wholesale and retail, runs brewing classes, and most of the treats on offer are vegan. The original location (right here) is housed in a spacious warehouse with ample seating for the laptop crowd.

35 Laurel St, Ottawa
ON K1Y 4M4, Canada

(613) 792-1309

Visit Website

One of the original third wave coffee spots in the city, the Ministry of Coffee’s recent expansions into Beechwood and the Via Railway Station build on a strong brewing reputation established at the original Elgin Street location. By day, gourmet sandwiches, baked goods, and nitro brew on tap are featured — the large Wellington Street location also stays open into the night, with craft beer and other drinks on offer.

1013 Wellington St W, Ottawa
ON K1Y 2Y1, Canada

(613) 695-9002

Visit Website

Originally housed in a bicycle shop in Hintonburg, small batch coffee roaster Little Victories has decamped to an airy new café in the Glebe. Its attention to detail is reflected in everything from the ethically sourced beans and brewing gear they sell, through to the design and printing on their bags.

801 Bank St, Ottawa
ON K1S 3V7, Canada

(613) 286-8647

Visit Website

Equator Coffee’s reputation for beans, brewing, and teaching extends from Westboro to beyond city limits in Almonte, while bureaucrats and art lovers alike can take in the view of Parliament from Equator’s newest location at the National Arts Centre downtown. This roaster maintains a strong connection to the communities where it sources organic, fair trade coffee, with the owners periodically heading to Nicaragua for the coffee harvest and to build classrooms.

412 Churchill Ave N, Ottawa
ON K1Z 5C6, Canada

(613) 722-1919

Visit Website

Stittsville residents flock to Quitters for daytime coffee and nighttime drinks served up by musician Kathleen Edwards. Fully licensed and kid- (and dog-) friendly, Quitters has a self-described rowdy Saturday night trivia scene, a patio, and parking.

1523 Stittsville Main St, Stittsville
ON K2S 1A6, Canada

Visit Website

Don’t Throw Spent Coffee Grounds and Leftover Coffee – Use them As Fertilizer

Coffee has many uses, and spent coffee grounds can be reused for many things, even as a fuel. One of the easiest ways to recycle your coffee waste is to use it as a fertilizer. Since coffee is slightly acidic, make sure you fertilize with it only plants that love an acidic soil. Since caffeine is a mild insecticide, you’ll keep away the pests as well, if coffee is black.

You should be watering your plants with your leftover coffeeYou should be watering your plants with your leftover coffee

While many of us humans rely on coffee to wake us up each and every day, we don’t realize that the plants around us could actually use a little caffeine pick-me-up themselves.

Apparently, coffee is a great source of nitrogen and plants that enjoy more acidic soil can benefit from certain levels of nitrogen, like blueberries, azaleas and rhododendrons. According to The Spruce, if you plan on doing this, you’ll need to keep a close eye on your plant. If you’re “watering” it with coffee and the leaves of the plant start yellowing at the edges or turning brown, it may mean that the liquid coffee is adding too much acid to the soil. A solution to this could be watering down your coffee before you pour it onto your plant.

Another reminder: The coffee you water your plant with needs to be black. That may seem obvious, but pouring out your leftover brew that contains sweeteners or dairy could attract pests like gnats. Even if you’re just using black coffee, you should stick to doing this only once a week.

What’s left over in your coffee pot isn’t the only beneficial part of coffee for your plants — the leftover grounds can also benefit your growing green friends as compost or fertilizer.

Sprinkling grounds into your plant’s soil not only serves as a mild acid fertilizer, but it can prevent slugs from appearing and also keep pesky animals out, like cats or rabbits.

For those of you who enjoy a cup or two (or three or four) a day, this little hack could definitely help cut back your coffee waste.

Coffee Could Be Used to Fight Obesity

Coffee was always on the list of popular remedies for weight control, however, for the first time there is serious research that shows coffee works. More than that, the study shows the mechanism that promotes weight control, and it aims to find the right amount of coffee for maximum efficacy.

Coffee Could Be Used to Fight Obesity, Says ‘Pioneering’ New Study

Coffee Could Be Used to Fight Obesity, Says ‘Pioneering’ New Study

Scientists have published an intriguing new study on how coffee may be relied upon to do much more than just wake us up in the morning.

Researchers from the University of Nottingham have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate “brown fat”, the body’s own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.

The study, published earlier this week in the journal Scientific Reports, is one of the first to be carried out in humans to find components which could have a direct effect on “brown fat” functions, an important part of the human body which plays a key role in how quickly we can burn calories as energy.

Brown adipose tissue (BAT), also known as brown fat, is one of two types of fat found in humans and other mammals. Initially only attributed to babies and hibernating mammals, it was discovered in recent years that adults can have brown fat too. Its main function is to generate body heat by burning calories (as opposed to white fat, which is a result of storing excess calories).

People with a lower body mass index (BMI) therefore have a higher amount of brown fat.

“Brown fat works in a different way to other fat in your body and produces heat by burning sugar and fat, often in response to cold,” said Professor Michael Symonds, from the School of Medicine at the University of Nottingham who co-directed the study.

“Increasing its activity improves blood sugar control as well as improving blood lipid levels and the extra calories burnt help with weight loss. However, until now, no one has found an acceptable way to stimulate its activity in humans.

“This is the first study in humans to show that something like a cup of coffee can have a direct effect on our brown fat functions. The potential implications of our results are pretty big, as obesity is a major health concern for society and we also have a growing diabetes epidemic and brown fat could potentially be part of the solution in tackling them.”

The team started with a series of stem cell studies to see if caffeine would stimulate brown fat. Once they had found the right dose, they then moved on to humans to see if the results were similar.

The team used a thermal imaging technique, which they’d previously pioneered, to trace the body’s brown fat reserves. The non-invasive technique helps the team to locate brown fat and assess its capacity to produce heat.

“From our previous work, we knew that brown fat is mainly located in the neck region, so we were able to image someone straight after they had a drink to see if the brown fat got hotter,” said Professor Symonds.

“The results were positive and we now need to ascertain that caffeine as one of the ingredients in the coffee is acting as the stimulus or if there’s another component helping with the activation of brown fat. We are currently looking at caffeine supplements to test whether the effect is similar.

“Once we have confirmed which component is responsible for this, it could potentially be used as part of a weight management regime or as part of glucose regulation program to help prevent diabetes.”

Coffee Cupping Professional – I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

If you ever wondered what is to cup coffee as a job, it’s not the glamorous job envisioned. Sure, the job has its perks, and its aura of coolness, but you have to spit a lot. A professional coffee cupper oversees the coffee quality and signs off the flavour profile for all coffees in a roastery.

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My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

I always start the day with two cups of coffee.

But by the end of work this number skyrockets to around 250 cups. Before you panic, I only taste these in a process called cupping.My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

It requires you to slurp the coffee and then spit it out into a spittoon, a bit like wine tasting.

Doing this helps to prevent me from over caffeinating myself and ensures that I sleep at night.

I work on the coffee buying team of Taylors of Harrogate and have been working here for 15 years. My job involves overseeing coffee quality and signing off the flavour profile for all new products.

The flavour profile is a combination of the taste and aroma of the coffee. The sign off process involves a panel of people from within the company coming together many times throughout the duration of any new product development to refine and approve the final product.

Coffee actually contains more aromas than wine. As a qualified Coffee Q grader – professional coffee taster – I’m able to recognise and name hundreds of different aromas that can be detected in coffees from all over the world.

It takes lots of intense training and practice to become a Q grader. The process involves passing around 20 predominantly sensory exams.My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

I never get tired of discovering new coffees and it’s certainly one of my favourite parts of the job, but I do have to limit my intake.

As a Coffee Cupper I Travel A Lot

My job isn’t just tasting coffee, however. When I’m not in the office, I’m usually travelling abroad.

My first trips to coffee-growing countries took me to Nicaragua, El Salvador, Brazil and Kenya where I spent a few months training.

I’ve also visited Colombia, Mexico, Honduras, Guatemala, Panama, Costa Rica, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and I’m due to travel to Indonesia later this year.

A typical origin trip can involve anything from visiting remote farms and processing facilities to tasting lots of coffee to calibrate with our suppliers.

My trips overseas have led me to appreciate the complexity of growing and processing coffee. I also often discover new words and ways to describe coffee when I’m tasting with people from other countries, which I love.My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

What Coffees Do I Like?

When it comes to what coffee takes my fancy, it can really depend what mood I’m in. It’s really subjective.

Coffee is also a seasonal product so its taste can vary throughout the year.

I’m particularly drawn to coffee from Colombia, Central America and East Africa because coffees from these countries tend to feature a good level of sweetness, balance and acidity.

I don’t like to use the word ‘snob’ but I’m definitely very particular about my coffee. Thankfully, I have easy access to some amazing flavours on a daily basis.

There are two main species of coffee: arabica and robusta. Arabica is a more species, which tends to be grown at higher altitudes and in cooler than climates. It’s sweeter, more aromatic and finer in flavour.

Robusta is a hardier species, which tends to grow at lower attitudes and warmer weather. Its flavour is stronger, more intense and can be bitter and sometimes harsh.My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

Personally, I prefer a lighter roast with delicately-nuanced flavour. Lighter roasts showcase the inherent characteristics of the beans and can result in a more unique flavour. I go for coffees with fruity (citrus or berry), floral (jasmine) and sweet, caramel notes.

If I’m drinking coffee out of the home or work, I like to hunt out the best coffee shops in town.

I take my coffee black or with milk but never sugar. It’s purely a personal preference, but I just feel that it overwhelms the actual flavour of the coffee.

One of the most common coffee mistakes people make is drinking stale coffee. They’ll open a bag of coffee but then leave it open for weeks before finishing it – and once the coffee is exposed to oxygen, it starts to go stale.

My recommendation would be to store your coffee in an air tight container and try to drink it within two to three weeks.

The national obsession with coffee has developed alongside the rise of high street coffee shops, and has been closely followed by the rise of independent coffee shops.

When I was growing up, you never went out for a coffee but now you do. It’s a social drink that brings people together.

Although we’re certainly not turning our backs on tea, we’re definitely becoming a coffee-drinking nation in the UK. It’s a way of life.My Odd Job: I taste 250 cups of coffee a day

How to Drink Coffee in Space

 

We love coffee and we think a day without coffee is the purgatory. Strike that – it’s Hell. How about coffee in space? How do astronauts drink their coffee? Did you know there is an espresso machine designed to work in space? Is called ISSpresso and it powers up our space explorers. That’s pretty amazing.

 

Charcoal Coffee Craze – Charcoal Latte Is Healthy

 

Charcoal Latte. To be honest, I didn’t know existed until recently, well because it’s a recent thing. To me, the visual aspect of a drink is half of the taste. I am a bit thrown off by the tar-like blackness and the glitter. Not sure I can stomach one of those. But people swear that charcoal is good for your stomach. I am a bit skeptical on that too. Search on the Internet “activated charcoal and constipation” and you’ll see why.  Limitless Coffee & Tea makes these on a regular basis, and you can also check their Instagram for pics.

A dash of glitter and an abyss of smoky black froth swirls around in a glossy white mug accompanied by a delicate golden teaspoon. The fresh vanilla scent and the laughter of other customers creates a homey feeling.

That dash of glitter and abyss of smoky black froth aren’t the first things that come to mind when drinking coffee. For customers at Limitless Coffee & Tea, it’s the cup of Joe that can’t stop customers from coming in every day.

Limitless Coffee & Tea has four locations all in the heart of downtown Chicago. If it’s not obvious, they’re a café that sells artistic coffee, tea and pastries. The latte that would be considered their starchild is the charcoal latte. This piece of art isn’t complete without the added glitter, which is an additional 50 cents that most will shell out to get their Instagram- worthy photo or 10.

 

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cute coffee is still coffee….disgusting

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Charcoal-based products are starting to make their way to shelves for everything, from charcoal toothpaste to facemasks, and now decorative latte art. Most people like to take pictures of them and put them on social media. Many cafes around the country have jumped on the bandwagon and started making them. Instead of being warded off by the unusually pretty color and design, they keep drawing customers and coffee fanatics in. Rather than just making the latte look aesthetically pleasing, there are also some benefits to that dark, deep charcoal abyss.

According to WebMd, activated charcoal is used to treat poisonings, reduce intestinal gas, can prevent hangovers and lower cholesterol levels. It’s also used for healing wounds.

Amanda Kaplan is the marketing manager at Limitless Tea & Coffee. She said there are many benefits to adding charcoal to lattes.

“Activated charcoal works by trapping toxins and chemicals in the gut, preventing their absorption,” Kaplan said.

Kaplan also said the texture is porous, so it’s good for cleaning and whitening teeth, which explains why charcoal toothpaste has become a thing.

 

“It is our No. 1 Instagrammed drink, and people show the barista our Instagram when ordering,” Kaplan said.

When it comes to food allergies, there’s no concerns here because charcoal is beneficial for health and it’s a natural product. For those interested in grabbing a smoky black latte, the type of milk you use could alter the design of the latte.

“ Any milk tastes amazing with it,” Kaplan said. “But the easiest drink to do latte art with is whole milk.”Whole milk is denser than nonfat, almond or soy milk. The denser the milk, the better the latte art will turn out.

Inside the charcoal coffee craze

Kaplan couldn’t answer some questions, such as how it’s made, due to the company’s privacy policies, but the mystery behind it stirs up more excitement for customers.

For the lactose-intolerant and vegans of the Chicago area, don’t fret; they also have oat milk and almond milk at every location. Ana Diaz was one the many customers who stopped in for a charcoal latte. Diaz didn’t know what to expect because this was her first time ordering one.

“I’m almost scared to drink it,” Diaz said. “I know it’s not bad for me or anything, but I’ve never had one before and didn’t even know you could ingest charcoal like this.”

“Of course I took a hundred pictures

of it already, my cousin and I came here because we’ve been seeing a lot of pictures of these pretty lattes on the Instagram explore page and noticed that a lot of cafes sell them, so we found this one and wanted to give it a try,” Diaz said.

Diaz took a few sips of her latte. “I keep checking my teeth,” she said. “I feel like my lips and teeth are going to be glittery and black after this so next time I’ll bring a little toothbrush.”

Jenn Nowak has been to several cafes that serve charcoal and glitter lattes.

“I can see why the color and even the glitter is off-putting for some people, it’s like a visual thing and it makes them hesitant to drink it,” Nowak said.

“For first-timers, they might think, ‘Why am I eating art supplies?’ when they see the glitter,” Nowak said.

Nowak remembers she was hesitant the first time she had one.

“The first time I tried one I kept making my friends reassure me that they were safe to drink, not that they would know, it’s not like they’re baristas or anything but I won’t lie, I was thrown off at first,” Nowak said.

The latte itself doesn’t have an unusual taste like most would expect.

“I think the thing people don’t get is that it just tastes like vanilla,” Nowak said. “It doesn’t taste funny and I’m willing to spend like $7 for a latte every now and then just because it’s fun and much prettier than an average old latte at Starbucks or Peets.”

Someone left a coffee cup in a ‘Game of Thrones’ shot

 

A coffee cup on a table in the great hall of Winterfell. People think it’s a Starbucks. Who cares? Maybe Starbucks do, it’s great publicity. Sharp-eyed viewers noticed the anachronism during Sunday night’s episode of “Game of Thrones,” was this on purpose? If so the level of sneakiness in advertising is peaking.

What’s this? Oh, just a coffee cup. A coffee cup on a table in the great hall of Winterfell in the fictional, very coffee-less realm of Westeros.Someone left a coffee cup in a 'Game of Thrones' shot

Sharp-eyed viewers noticed the anachronism during Sunday night’s episode of “Game of Thrones,” and, well, it’s going to be a long time before anyone lets this mistake go.

Each Season 8 episode reportedly cost $15 million to make , so the fact that a grande mocha from Starbucks or whatever passed so many eyes and so many levels of experts and edits is very hilarious. That coffee cup is Arya Stark levels of sneaky.

Twitter is convinced it’s a Starbucks cup, but it really could be from anywhere.

It’s hard to tell. Either way, it’s a good day to be Starbucks, right? Imagine scoring some free product placement in the biggest show on television.

Maybe that’s why the Battle of Winterfell episode was so dark — no time to get rid of all of the coffee cups! Without the low lighting, everyone would be able to tell the ramparts of Winterfell looked like the aftermath of an 8 a.m. college lecture.

Maybe that’s why the Battle of Winterfell episode was so dark — no time to get rid of all of the coffee cups! Without the low lighting, everyone would be able to tell the ramparts of Winterfell looked like the aftermath of an 8 a.m. college lecture.

Genius.

 

This Hoodie Is Made From Coffee Grounds And Recycled Plastic Bottles

You’d be surprised how versatile coffee is. No I am not talking about brewing versatility, because that’s amazing too, you can ask Coffee Brewing Methods about that. I meant versatility as an industrial material. A Utah apparel company called Coalatree is making hoodies using recycled coffee grounds. Sure, the hoodies contain some plastic, but you know what? Tha plastic is also recycled from plastic bottles, so the feeling of sustainability is comforting. […]

This Hoodie Is Made From Coffee Grounds And Recycled Plastic Bottles

This Hoodie Is Made From Coffee Grounds And Recycled Plastic Bottles

A Utah apparel company called Coalatree is making hoodies using recycled coffee grounds. No, the hoodie won’t let you absorb caffeine through the skin (unfortunately, for drowsy coffee drinkers). But they’re also made with plastic bottles, so the feeling of sustainability is comforting.

The Evolution Hoodie is said to be snuggly. Coalatree notes that it takes thousands of liters of water to make one cotton shirt. Each hoodie is made of fiber derived from three cups of recycled coffee grounds and 10 plastic bottles. They’re selling for $69 via an Indiegogo campaign, and expected to ship to backers in September.

Spent coffee grounds are mixed and melted with recycled plastic bottles, then extruded into the fibers to create the hoodie. The process requires minimal resources and uses sustainable technologies such as solar power and gray water recycling, says J.M. Fabrizi, Coalatree’s marketing manager.

It turns out that coffee is good for more than just mugs in the morning.

“Coffee is a naturally odor-absorbing material and by weaving the grounds into the fibers, odors are trapped as you sweat,” Fabrizi says. “Because the grounds are embedded into the fabric, this feature is permanent and will never wash out.”

Coffee also is naturally moisture-wicking, the company says, so the hoodie dries quickly on a hike, for instance. And tiny pores in the fabric block nearly six times more ultraviolet rays than a traditional hoodie.

The hoodie is intended for travel, adventure and everyday use, and packed with features like pockets for a phone and passport.

The hoodie isn’t the end of coffee-infused clothing, either.

Hiking socks also are being produced; odor-absorbing properties can be especially helpful for feet.

Coalatree has been around since 2010, according to Fabrizi. Besides finding green alternatives to cotton, they use surplus fabric to create blankets for the homeless in Salt Lake City, Utah; donate portions of sales on specific products to indigenous communities in need; and partner with local environmental organizations to care for trails and wild spaces.This Hoodie Is Made From Coffee Grounds And Recycled Plastic Bottles

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