August 4

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HISTORY OF COFFEE: Coffee Beans are Second Most Traded Raw Material Worldwide

By coffee-admin

August 4, 2020

Coffee, making

Coffee’s beginnings are enveloped in mystery and lore

Coffee beans are now the second most traded raw material worldwide, after crude oil, with sales over $55 billion a year. Legend has it that one day, many hundreds of years ago in the Ethiopian highlands, Kaldi’s goats started eating some berries they found on a tree and became so energetic that they wouldn’t go to sleep that night. The story of the coffee plant and the drink we make from it is pretty remarkable, but no one is really sure when and where it was first discovered. The best-known […]

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The story of the coffee plant and the drink we make from it is pretty remarkable, but no one is really sure when and where it was first discovered. The best-known rumor is about a goatherd called Kaldi.

Coffee Originated in Ethiopia

Legend has it that one day, many hundreds of years ago in the Ethiopian highlands, Kaldi’s goats started eating some berries they found on a tree and became so energetic that they wouldn’t go to sleep that night.

Intrigued, Kaldi collected some of the berries and the following morning took them to his local monastery and explained the effect they had on his goats. The monks roasted the berries and mixed them with water, creating a delicious drink.

First Coffee Shop Introduced Over 500 Years Ago on the Arabian Peninsula

Whether from Kaldi’s monastery or some other source, by the 15th century both coffee beans and excitement about their energizing effects spread from Ethiopia to the Arabian Peninsula.

The beverage initially met with controversy and was banned on religious grounds. But soon people realized that coffee would help them stay alert during long prayer and study sessions, and the bans were reversed.

HISTORY OF COFFEE: Coffee Beans are Second Most Traded Raw Material Worldwide

Holy Land Pilgrimages Bring ‘Bitter Invention of Satan’ to Western World

Thousands of people from Europe traveled to the holy city of Mecca on the Arabian Peninsula each year on religious pilgrimages, and in the 17th century, some of them took coffee back home with them.

Again the drink was met with suspicion and fear as priests called it the “bitter invention of Satan.” Pope Clement VIII was asked to intervene, but when trying coffee for himself he found it so delicious he decided to baptize it, meaning Catholics were free to enjoy it.

HISTORY OF COFFEE: Coffee Beans are Second Most Traded Raw Material Worldwide

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